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Alerts

If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours.  For more advice on how to protect your business from malicious online attacks and data breaches visit www.bbb.org.

4/14/14 Heartbleed Information:
With regard to addressing the potential impact of the recently identified “Heartbleed” Open SSL vulnerability, First Dakota’s Incident Response Team researched the issue and confirmed our systems are not affected, because we do not use Open SSL. Our mobile banking and online banking services are safe and secure for your use. As always, we encourage you to monitor your accounts regularly for any suspicious activity and to contact us immediately if any suspicious transactions are detected. We also encourage you to change your passwords on all internet sites on a regular basis. To learn more, please review
www.aba.com.


1/23/14  South Dakota Focus program Debt Control

Click here to watch South Dakota Focus program Debt Control featuring Kevin Watt. Learn what help is available for you and those who you know.


1/8/14  Phone Scam

First Dakota has been notified by customers indicating they are receiving text messages and phone calls stating their Checkcard has been compromised. Caller is asking for card number, expiration date, CVV and pin. Two different numbers have been used for call back: 808-419-7613 and 773-360-3426.

First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not respond. Even if the call or email seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately.


MESSAGE TO OUR CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE TARGET STORES BREACH


First Dakota National Bank is aware of the recent report impacting cardholders who used their debit/Checkcard or credit cards at Target® Stores between November 27 and December 15, 2013.

Please be assured First Dakota’s systems were not impacted or compromised. This reported breach occurred within the retailer's system, not ours. To help ensure fraudulent activity on your debit/Checkcard is being identified immediately, we encourage you to monitor your account activity via Internet Banking. If fraudulent transactions are discovered, notify First Dakota at 800.486.4712.

At First Dakota we are dedicated to protecting customer and account information. We have a Fraud Center that monitors our cardholders’ accounts for suspicious activity 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. If we suspect fraudulent activity, we will contact you. As always, Visa's Zero Liability policy ensures you won't be held responsible for fraudulent charges made with your VISA card. If you have questions regarding:
>First Dakota debit/checkcard, call 800.486.4712 or 866.546.8273 after bank hours
>First Dakota credit card, call 800.444.6938 


3/13/13  Phone Scam

First Dakota has been notified by a customer indicating he had a message on his answering machine to call First Dakota at 888-362-8595 and speak with Kevin and gave a reference number of 0500. When he called the number back, he got an automated recording asking him to enter the last 4 digits of his SSN. At this point he ended the call and called his local First Dakota branch to report the call.

First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not respond. Even if the call or email seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately.


3/11/13  Alert from KELOLAND


A new scam is attacking KELOLAND and it targets checking accounts. Victims feel violated and Sioux Falls police say there isn’t much they can do to track down the suspects. It's a scam Candy Schultz wouldn't have noticed, if her husband hadn't urged her to look closely at her bank statement earlier this week. "I thought, oh my god, something is wrong," Schultz said. She found she's the latest victim of identity theft through e-checks. "I went and called the bank right away and they said, well it's a legitimate check, it came through," Schultz said. But it's a check Schultz never authorized, or had ever seen before. Using her information and bank routing number, someone made a check and cashed $30 to FastLoanFast. In the memo line, it says loan4utoday.com. "It's just not right," Schultz said. Sioux Falls Police Officer Sam Clemens says scammers are getting more creative to get a hold of your money and personal information. "It's kind of a scary thing," Clemens said. And while it's nearly impossible to track down how the information was taken, Clemens believes someone stole a check or a legitimate business filed Schultz's information after doing business with her, and was hacked. "You never really know, you're writing checks that are going through different hands. It doesn't take much for somebody to grab hold of that check and have those routing numbers," Clemens said. And while Schultz's bank has already reimbursed the money taken from her account and she's changed all of her personal information, she wants her experience to be a warning for others. "I felt that other people need to know this is going on if they find something going on in their account, they need to do something right away," Schultz said.

Since finding out about the theft, Schultz has been receiving numerous phone calls from scammers, indicating more of her information is being passed around. Police say if you feel you are the victim of identity theft, you should contact your financial institution immediately and have them to file a report.


4/3/12

First Dakota has been notified by Visa of a confirmed data security breach involving a third-party payment processor, Global Payments Inc. Global Payments Inc. has issued a press release confirming unauthorized access into their processing system between January 21, 2012 and February 25, 2012. This appears to be the largest such incident since the Heartland Payment Systems breach in January 2009.

Because Global Payments Inc. is a leader in payment processing services, the breach is being highly publicized. Please be aware of this breach. Scammers could begin sending emails, and use other social engineering schemes to convince consumers their cards have been compromised and the need to respond.

It is important to be educated about phishing scams that are used to obtain personal information. First Dakota will NEVER ask for personal information via phone, email, or text message. Please refer to the information located on the customer education page of our Website. www.FirstDakota.com/ConsumerEducation.aspx

When First Dakota receives a Compromised Account Management System (CAMS) alert. First Dakota mails notification letters to affected customers informing them new check cards have been ordered for them. As the new cards are activated, the compromised card is closed.

2/23/12 E-Mail Scam

First Dakota has been notified of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from a merchant. 

The e-mails appear to be sent from "Newegg info@newegg.com"

The subject lines reads "Your credit card has been successfully charged."

The fraudulent messages state:
"Dear Customer, Thank you for shopping at Newegg.com.

We are happy to inform you that your order (Sales Order Number: 85970879) has been successfully charged to your credit card for 2,352.93 USD and order verification is now complete.

Please CLICK HERE to see your INVOICE.

If you have any questions, please use our LiveChat function or visit our Contact Us Page. Once You Know, You Newegg. Your Newegg.com Customer Service Team" 

 
These e-mails and the link included are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.


11/28/11 Email Scam

Yankton Press and Dakotan, Monday, November 28th BBB Warns Of Malicious Emails The Better Business Bureau is warning businesses to beware of a malicious email that pretends to be from the BBB, and concerns a complaint filed against the company.

The phishing email is sent from multiple email addresses with the subject line “Complaint #” followed by a nine-digit number. BBB Accredited and Non-Accredited Businesses have been targeted and some consumers have received the email. The body of the email claims that the company has received a complaint and asks them to respond to the complaint by directing them to a link shown as our national website at http://www.bbb.org which actually is a disguised link to a third party website. The link given actually goes to the site caxehid.getfreehosting.co.uk/.

Since the message is fraudulent, the BBB advises any business that receives this email to take the following steps:
• Do not click on any links or reply to the message. Completely delete the message from your inbox, and run a full virus scan on your computer if you did click on any links
• If you receive an email from the BBB about a complaint filed against your business and need assistance in determining whether or not it is legitimate, contact the BBB Serving Nebraska, South Dakota, and southwest Iowa at 800-649-6814. Complaints handled by the BBB Serving Nebraska, South Dakota and Southwest Iowa always begin with “3000,” and never include an attachment unless requested by the company.



9/16/11 E-Mail Scam

First Dakota has been notified of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from credit score companies.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses

They have various subject lines such as "Your TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian credit scores may have changed."

The fraudulent messages state:
"Your TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian credit scores may have changed. View now at no cost to you, and also receive score monitoring at all three major bureaus: Check your score now.

These e-mails and the link included are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.


9/2/11 FDIC Issues Special Alert on Fraudulent E-Mails With Infected Attachment

The FDIC yesterday issued a special alert on fraudulent e-mails that appear to be sent from the agency and contain an infected attachment. The bogus e-mails have addresses on the ‘From” line such as “no.reply@fdic.gov” or “notify84zma@fdic.gov”; inform recipients that their “account ACH and WIRE transaction have been temporarily suspended for security reasons”; and contain spelling and grammatical errors. The e-mails’ attachment -- “FDIC_document.zip” -- is likely to release malicious software if opened, the FDIC said. Read more. View an example of the fraudulent e-mails.


First Dakota Customer Alert -
Fraudulent Checkcard Calls 
8/18/11

First Dakota has been notified of a phone scam in which residents are receiving calls stating their Checkcard/ATM card is restricted from making purchases due to updates and to check security press one. The message then instructs listeners to enter their card number and/or PIN number. These calls are fraudulent and have not been authorized by First Dakota or any other bank. DO NOT enter any information or return the call. If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours. First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not RESPOND. Even if the call or website seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately. For more consumer education hints, tips and alerts click here.


7/19/11 The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "protection@fdic.gov," "admin@administration.fdic.gov," or service@admin.fdic.gov.

They have various subject lines such as "Update for your banking account," "ACH and Wire transfers disabled," and "Banking security update."

The fraudulent messages state:
"Dear clients, Your account ACH and Wire transactions have been temporarily suspended for your Security, due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest Updates, follow this link. As soon as it is set up, your transaction abilities will be fully restored. Best regards, Online security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

These e-mails and links are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider these e-mails an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT install any related files or software updates.

Consumers should be aware that these fraudulent e-mails may be modified over time with other subject lines, sender names, and narratives. The FDIC does not directly contact bank customers, nor does the FDIC request bank customers to install software upgrades.


The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or accounts@fdic.gov.

They have subject lines that read: "FDIC: Your business account" or "FDIC: About Your Business Account."

The e-mails are addressed to "Business Customer" or "Business Owner" and state "We have important information about your bank" or "…financial institution." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details."

They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

These e-mails and the link included are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.


VISA/MasterCard Fraud Scam

We received the following information about a VISA/MasterCard Fraud Scam. The scam works like this:

- Person calling says- "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA/MasterCard. My badge number is 12460, Your card has been flagged for unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA/MasterCard which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for $497.99 from a marketing company based in Arizona?" When you say "no", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives your address), is that correct?" You say "yes".

- The caller continues - "I will be starting a Fraud Investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 1 800 number listed on the back of your card (1-800-VISA) and ask for Security. You will need to refer to the control number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number.

- Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works - The caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card." They will ask you to turn your card over and provide the last 3 numbers. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?"

- After you say no, the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do" and hangs ups. You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the card number. What the scammers wants is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. DON'T give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or MasterCard directly for verification of their conversation. VISA stated that is a scam and they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card. If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN number, you think you're receiving a credit; however, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

How does First Dakota's Fraud Risk Management Program work:
    - If our Risk Management teams suspects fraud, they will contact you daily from the hours of 8 am until 9 pm in your time 
      zone. 

    - The analyst will never ask for any information from you, they will be giving you information and will tell you to contact your 
      Financial institution.

    - If fraud is confirmed, you will be instructed to contact the financial insititution.

    - If you cannot be reached, the fraud analyst will place a black on the card and leave a message with the Toll Free phone 
      number, so you can contact the Fraud Center. 

    - If you are in doubt about what our Fraud Center is questioning, please call First Dakota directly at 605-665-7432 or 
           800-486-4712.


Customer Alert - Fraudulent emails Regarding Online Account
Started 10/1/10

First Dakota National Bank has been notified of an email scam in which residents are receiving emails from a fraudulent email address. The email address resembles a First Dakota email and states:

Dear Valued Customer,

Your access to Online Banking Service has been suspended. Due to a miss-match access code between your Security information. To enable you continue accessing your online account it will only take you few minutes to verify your Identity. Follow the reference below and you will be guided to where you can gain an instant verification process.

https://www.firstdekota.com/wps/portal/iblogin

IMPORTANT - You are strictly advised to match your Sensitive Details correctly to avoid service denial.

Thank you for helping us to protect you.

First Dekotal National Bank

If you have logged in using your Internet Banking ID and Internet Banking password please contact your First Dakota location immediately.

Do not enter any information.

If you responded and provided your Internet Banking ID, Internet Banking Password, or any other personal information, please contact your bank immediately. 


  
 

First Dakota Customer Alert -
Fraudulent Calls
9/30/10

First Dakota has been notified of a phone scam in which residents are receiving automated calls phishing for confidential information. These calls are fraudulent and have not been authorized by First Dakota.

DO NOT enter any information or return the call.

If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours.

First Dakota will NEVER place an unsolicited call or email to request personal information. If you receive one of these calls or emails, do not respond! Even if the call or website seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately. 

For more consumer education hints, tips and alerts click here


Electronic Payments Association Phishing alert -
Email claiming to be from the "Electronic Payments Association"
8/19/10

 

NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies have received a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of having been sent from NACHA and signed by a non-existent NACHA employee. See sample below.

 

Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to individuals or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system. Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated.

Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software applications security patches are installed and current.

Be alert for different variations of fraudulent e-mails.

 = = = = = Sample E-mail = = = = = =

Dear bank account holder,

The ACH transaction, recently initiated from your bank account (by you or any other person), was rejected by the Electronic Payments Association.

Please Find Attached Transaction Report


 

Association Warns Card Fraud on Sudden Rise

Elaine Dodd, VP of Oklahoma Bankers Association's Fraud Division reports a recent major increase in debit card fraud in Oklahoma and surrounding states. The latest threat seems to be 'skimmer' devices criminals put in retail locations that can remotely transmit account information to the criminal perpetrator. At this time, investigators have not been able to pinpoint any one specific breach of card data causing this fraud increase.

Federal investigators are on the case trying to track scammers down but Dodd says many consumers aren't doing themselves any favors. "We need to be looking at our statements. A very small percentage of the world looks at their bank statements every month, which is just awful."

Dodd recommends that banks remind customers to take a few minutes a day to log on and check their bank and credit card accounts to help catch problems before things go wrong. If customers don't have online access, remind them to examine their monthly paper statements closely.  


Electronic Payments Association Phishing alert -
Email claiming to be from NACHA
7/22/10

NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies have received fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of having been sent from NACHA. See sample below.

The subject line of the e-mail states: “Unauthorized ACH Transaction.” The e-mail includes a link to redirect the individual to a fake Web page and contains a link which is almost certainly an executable virus with malware. Do not click on the link. Both the e-mail and the related website are fraudulent.

Be aware that phishing e-mails frequently have links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not follow Web links in unsolicited e-mails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to individuals or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system. Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated.

Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software applications security patches are installed and current.

Be alert for different variations of fraudulent e-mails.

 = = = = = Sample E-mail = = = = = =

From: Information
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 8:27 AM
To: Doe, John
Subject: Unauthorized ACH Transaction

Dear bank account holder,

The ACH transaction, recently initiated from your bank account, was rejected by the Electronic Payments Association. Please review the transaction report by clicking the link below:

Unauthorized ACH Transaction Report

 


 

First Dakota Customer Alert -
Fraudulent Text Messages regarding First Dakota Checkcard
7/15/10

First Dakota has been notified of a phone scam in which residents are receiving text messages stating:

First Dakota National Bank ALERT: Your CARD starting with 4408 has been DEACTIVATED. Please call: 866-375-6459. Voice Mail (502).

These calls are fraudulent and have not been authorized by First Dakota. DO NOT enter any information or return the call.

If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours.

First Dakota will NEVER place an unsolicited call or email to request personal information. If you receive one of these calls or emails, do not respond! Even if the call or website seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately. 

For more consumer education hints, tips and alerts click here

Click here to read Phishing Scam Letter to Editor from the Yankton Press & Dakotan


First Dakota Customer Alert -
Fraudulent Calls regarding First Dakota Checkcard
7/7/10

First Dakota has been notified of a phone scam in which residents are receiving calls stating their First Dakota Checkcard/ATM card is restricted from making purchases due to updates and to check security press one. The message then instructs listeners to enter their card number and/or PIN number. These calls are fraudulent and have not been authorized by First Dakota.

DO NOT enter any information or return the call.

If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours.

First Dakota will NEVER place an unsolicited call or email to request personal information. If you receive one of these calls or emails, do not respond! Even if the call or website seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately. 

For more consumer education hints, tips and alerts click here

 


 

Customer Alert - Fraudulent Text Messages 
Started 6/30/10

First Dakota National Bank has been notified of a text message scam asking for your social security number. This text is fraudulent and has NOT been authorized by First Dakota. First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone, text, or email.


 

 

First Dakota Customer Alert -
Fraudulent Calls regarding First Dakota Checkcard
6/23/10

First Dakota has been notified of a phone scam in which residents are receiving calls stating their First Dakota Checkcard/ATM card is restricted from making purchases due to updates and to check security press one. The message then instructs listeners to enter their card number and/or PIN number. These calls are fraudulent and have not been authorized by First Dakota.

DO NOT enter any information or return the call.

If you have responded and given your PIN number or any personal information, immediately contact First Dakota at 800-486-4712 or 866-546-8273 after bank hours.

First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not RESPOND. Even if the call or website seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately. 

For more consumer education hints, tips and alerts click here


 

American Bankers Association (ABA) Warns of Fraudulent Email
1/27/10

ABA's name is being used in a new phishing email, the association learned yesterday. The e-mail informs recipients that an "unauthorized transaction" has been charged to their account using their bank card. The amount of the transaction is listed, and recipients are asked to click on a link to review the transaction.

The e-mail is fraudulent, and recipients should not click on the link.

While phishing for personal information has been a long-standing practice, criminals are increasingly phishing for access to corporate, small business and governmental accounts, and they are using that access to withdraw large sums of money from them. Clicking on links in such e-mails could enable the fraudsters to download malicious software into victims' computers and steal passwords and other account identifiers.

ABA is working with law enforcement to identify the source of the e-mails and to disrupt them.


2nd Computer Alert from FBI and American Bankers Association
1/8/10

The FBI and the American Bankers Association are warning small business owners to use one computer to handle online banking activities and yet another entirely to surf  the web and for email. This approach, while blunt, is the best way to prevent malicious software from infecting the computer and makes it much harder to manipulate electronic transfers.


 

Phishing Alert from NACHA
Started 11/12/09

Random individuals and/or companies may have received a falsified e-mail with the subject title "Rejected ACH Transaction." This e-mail appears to be from NACHA - The Electronic Payments Association telling them that there is a problem with an ACH transaction they have originated. The e-mail included a link which redirects the individual to a fake web page which appears like the NACHA website and contains a link which is almost certainly executable virus with malware. See sample below:

From: nacha.org [mailto:report@nacha.org]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2009
To: Doe, John
Subject: Rejected ACH transaction, please review the transaction report

Dear bank account holder,

The ACH transaction, recently initiated from your bank account, was rejected by the Electronic Payments Association. Please review the transaction report by clicking the link below:

Unauthorized ACH Transaction Report (this is how the link is presented)


 

ABA warns of New Brand of Phishing, a new Danger to Business Customers.
October 26, 2009

 

Well, the phishers have moved on again. This time they are after your small-business customers. They craft e-mails addressed to the business CFO or owner that look like court subpoenas, tax liens or other documents that the businessman might be very inclined to click on. The CFO, owner or other business employee's name might be in the body of the e-mail, making it seem even more professional. When clicked on, malware is posted on the business' computer that patiently waits for bank passwords and ids. Armed with these credentials, the criminals have in some cases completely cleaned out a company's bank account via ACH or wire. School districts, utilities and other public entities have also been attacked.

The FBI has been working with NACHA and the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center to alert banks and their business customers to protection measures.

 

 


Banc Investment Daily, September 1, 2009

An industry group that keeps tabs on crimes against the financial sector warns cyber attacks are increasing against small and mid-sized businesses. Thieves will usually send a targeted email to the company controller and include a virus or link that installs malicious software to steal passwords.

 

 


ABA Warns of Fraudulent Letters, Fake Checks

ABA has been alerted that individuals sending cash-prize letters purporting to be from the association are part of a fake check scam. The con artists are sending letters asking people to call a phone number to find out how to collect a prize- a popular technique to get personal financial information from letter recipients.

Many of the letters contain one or more fraudulent checks, and a number of individuals have attempted to cash or deposit these fraudulent checks. The fraudulent checks are listed as from ABA and ABD Federal Credit Union, but the association believes other financial institutions may be targeted. The check amount is typically between $1,000 and $5,000. ABA is working with law enforcement to identify and disrupt the source of the letters. 

 


Customer Alert - Fraudulent emails Regarding Online Account
Started 7/21/09

First Dakota National Bank has been notified of an email scam in which residents are receiving emails from a fraudulent email address. The email address resembles a First Dakota email and states:

 

You have 1 new ALERT message
Please login to your First Dakota National Bank Online Login
and visit the Message Center section in order to read the message.

To Login, please click the link below:

First Dakota National Bank Online Banking

If you have logged in using your Internet Banking ID and Internet Banking password please contact your First Dakota location immediately.

Do not enter any information.

If you have responded and given your card number, PIN number or any personal information, please contact your bank immediately.


Customer Alert- Fraudulent emails Regarding Temporarily Suspended Account
Started 6/4/09

Customers and non-customers have notified First Dakota National Bank of an email scam in which residents are receiving emails from a fraudulent email address. The email address resembles a First Dakota email and states:

            Dear First Dakota National Bank Member,

            This email is to inform you that your online account has been temporarily suspended.

            Reason: Identity Verification.
         
   
            In order to continue using the Online Banking please verify your profile.
            
            
Unlocking your profile will take approximately one minute to complete.

            To continue click here
          

DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL! If you have responded and given personal information, please contact your bank immediately.
Thank you to those who contacted us! This type of scam is called "phishing" and that's exactly what these thieves are doing: "fishing" for your personal information. They are looking for account numbers, passwords, Social Security numbers and other confidential information. They can do damage to your financial history and personal reputation that can take years to unravel. The important thing is to understand how phishing works and how to protect yourself from this crime.

First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not respond. Even if the call or email seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately.

 


Customer Alert - Fraudulent Text Messages Regarding Debit Card Information
Started 4/24/09

First Dakota National Bank has been notified of a text message scam in which residents are receiving a text stating their account has been restricted. This text is fraudulent and has NOT been authorized by First Dakota. First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone, text, or email.


Customer Alert - Fraudulent emails Regarding Debit Card Information
Started 4/22/09

First Dakota National Bank has been notified of an email scam in which residents are receiving emails from a fraudulent email address. The email address resembles a First Dakota email and states:

 

You have 1 new ALERT message
Please login to your First Dakota National Bank Online Login
and visit the Message Center section in order to read the message.

To Login, please click the link below:

First Dakota National Bank Online Banking

If you have logged in using your internet banking ID and internet banking password please contact your First Dakota location immediately.

Once in the link the fraudulent “phishing site” states your Internet Banking Account is currently locked. Please enter your personal information below. Then the email asks for your name, email, zip code and debit card information. These emails are fraudulent and have NOT been authorized by First Dakota. First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email.

 

Do not enter any information.

If you have responded and given your card number, PIN number or any personal information, please contact your bank immediately.

This type of scam is called “phishing” and that’s exactly what these thieves are doing: “fishing” for your personal financial information. They are looking for account numbers, passwords, Social Security numbers and other confidential information. They can do damage to your financial history and personal reputation that can take years to unravel. The important thing is to understand how phishing works and how to protect yourself from this crime.

 

Here are some tips from fdic.gov on how to protect yourself from "phishing" scams:

 

1. Never provide your personal information in response to an unsolicited request whether it is over the phone or over the Internet. E-mails and Internet pages created by phishers may look exactly like the real thing. If you did not initiate the communication, you should not provide any information.
2. If you believe the contact may be legitimate, contact the financial institution yourself.You can find phone numbers and Web sites on the monthly statements you receive from your financial institution, or you can look the company up in a phone book or on the Internet. The key is that you should be the one to initiate the contact, using contact information that you have verified yourself.
3. Never provide your password over the phone or in response to an unsolicited Internet request.A financial institution would never ask you to verify your account information online. Thieves armed with this information and your account number can help themselves to your savings.
4. Review account statements regularly to ensure all charges are correct. If your account statement is late in arriving, call your financial institution to find out why. If your financial institution offers electronic account access, periodically review activity online to catch suspicious activity.First Dakota National Bank's website url address will always contain https, which denotes that is a secured website. For example https://www.firstdakota.com/Default.aspx

This scam is in addition to the phone scam that began on Friday, April 17.

First Dakota will NEVER request your personal information via phone or email. If you receive a call or email asking to provide personal or sensitive information, do not respond. Even if the call or email seems genuine, do not continue. Please contact your First Dakota location immediately.


 

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